Discipline (Family Meetings) – Two years ago, I interviewed a Positive Discipline author as part of research for a parenting workshop at school. We had a cycle of yelling, threatening, and nagging regarding discipline, which was unproductive and exhausting everyone in the household. ‘Do you hold family gatherings?’ she inquired.

It’s not like we’re in an emergency; we don’t need to meet. I mentioned that we talk to each other over supper or in the car while driving to school.

A family gathering is a terrific way to get to the bottom of the issues when you all live in the same place.

There are several ways in which family members wield their influence in various ways.

A family meeting allows each member to exercise their authority productively and courteously.

Instructions for conducting family gatherings

1. Make a Plan of Action

Get together on a day when you can all spend half an hour together. Once a day and time have been chosen, it is imperative that you meet on that day and at that time each week.

Having a specific day and time helps your children understand that this is a top priority for you and your family. Changing the date of the meeting reduces its significance and makes it less likely to become a regular occurrence.

2. Solicit Participation from Interested Parties.

When we first had a meeting, my four years old, which is an excellent age to begin because 4-year-olds are naturally curious about the world around them.

We discussed with the rest of the family that after their bedtime is preferable if you have children under the age of 4. As a result of my skepticism, we decided to wager on how long each of the children would last in the meeting.

Our phones rang while sitting in the living room, and our text messages went unanswered. We were surprised when the boys realized they had our attention, and the meeting lasted as long as a Batman episode.

3. Decide on the best methods.

Make a sandwich out of the family gathering arrangement. As a first step, have everyone in the family say something kind about the other family members.

At first, it may seem ridiculous, but as time goes on, you’ll look forward to hearing what everyone has to say. As soon as everyone feels good, move on to one or two more challenging situations that demand you and your children to work together to solve a problem.

Sprinkle in some housekeeping themes, such as daily routines and meal planning, to round out the discussion. You may top it off with something fun, like a game of tag or an ice-cream run, or both.

Your meeting can run more smoothly if you have traditions that you follow.

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