Book-based instruction on topics such as Black history, racism, and anti-racism can help children of all ages. Here are some books that go beyond simply honoring Black heroes and should be added to your library. We’ve gathered the best anti-racist children’s books that you can share with your kids.

One of the reasons it is vital to read books with our children that go beyond simply celebrating Black heroes is the global confrontation with institutional racism.

Anti-racism books that we share with our children can help them develop their character.

  • Make the most of our shared humanity.
  • Racism and injustice have their roots in the ideologies, 
  • systems, and structures that have and continue to exist.
  • Each of us plays a role in rewriting the narrative and deconstructing the institutions that hold us back.

Katie Kissinger’s All the Colors We Are

Young children will learn about the straightforward, scientifically accurate reasons we have different skin tones from this beautiful bilingual (English and Spanish) book. Changes in the way youngsters learn about skin color and proper vocabulary (you’ll hear “melanin” a lot) help them identify facts from myths when they confront skin color stereotypes.

Julius Lester’s Let’s Talk About Race

Children will learn from this book that we are all fundamentally the same. Rather than fearing difference, it provides kids with age-appropriate tools and ideas to help them embrace it.

The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles

In this historical narrative about the first African American student to be integrated into a New Orleans school, children learn about the racism and deceit that impacted how white Americans regarded (and, in some cases, still view) Black people. This 6-year-old girl’s courage, fortitude, and confidence in God as she puts her life in danger every day to acquire an education should inspire all youngsters.

Jacqueline Woodson’s “Harbor Me”

In “ARTT,” a weekly meeting of six youngsters sans adults, the author of this New York Times bestseller documents their conversations (a room to talk). Readers gain insight into the processes and mechanisms that affect people of color in our society as they share their lives, worries, and goals in that room. Thanks to the stories, there is a lot to talk about with grownups.

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-Winning Stamped from the Beginning by Jason Reynolds

To inspire young people to rid themselves of racist thinking and take action to create an anti-racist future, this book is fantastic. It helps readers understand how racism has been used to obtain and maintain power and how it divides and silences people. It aids them in comprehending our attitudes toward race and the persistence of racism.