HAVE FUN IN THE RAIN

These play-and-pretend ideas will keep kids occupied and delighted for hours when weather or snow prevents them from playing outside.

Make Your Puppets and Perform a Show.

Cotton socks, paper bags, crayons, and buttons have all been used to make our puppets. The Puppet Box is a great place to keep all of your kid’s puppetry supplies in one convenient location. Keep an eye out for amusing adornments, whether you’re cleaning the house or shopping at grocery, thrift, or dollar stores.

To get started, gather and purchase the following materials:

  • Glitzy materials such as glitter and dried beans.
  • Tinsel and tinsel-like materials such as string.
  • Buttons and appliques.
  • Holiday decorations such as stickers and seashells (beware of small objects that could pose a choking hazard for small children).

All the necessary supplies for making puppets should be included in your Puppet Box (Do your own sewing or keep an eye on the little ones while they do theirs.). Background scenery and props can be cut out and colored using a few cardboard boxes that have been folded flat for easy storage.

Erect a fortress

Drape some old sheets and blankets over the living room or dining room furnishings. (Take particular caution when handling breakables and priceless possessions.) Using hair scrunchies and hair ties or ribbons from your sewing kit, bind the bottoms of the fabric to chairs and tables.

Encourage your children to devise a unique password that only they (and perhaps their parents or siblings) will know. To make camping even more appealing to your child, invest in battery-operated camping lanterns, sleeping bags, books about camping, and flashlights.

Make a Rainy Day Dress-Up Chest

Find fascinating old clothing and accessories around the house, on sale racks, and in dollar or thrift stores. Prepare a wide range of headgear (cowboy, Mexican, baseball, hard-hat), jewelry, and shoes for both adults and children, as well as plenty of apparel for all of the aforementioned events (dresses, skirts, and jackets). Anything that can be utilized as a prop in a story should be collected.

Place the things in a cardboard box or a large plastic storage container. For those days when it’s raining or snowing, pull out the dress-up chest and let your imagination go wild!

Make Gifts of Appreciation

It’s common for children to express gratitude to their family members, teachers, babysitters, and neighbors. It’s fun to bake a batch of cookies and let your child decorate and wrap them with ribbon or plain printer paper. You could also have your child make thank-you cards on construction paper. Adorn with photographs, ribbons, glitter, and buttons can be passed on (Keep an eye out for choking dangers, especially for infants and toddlers, once again).

Let your kids compose and print their messages in fancy fonts on the computer to help them develop their spelling and letter recognition skills. The goal of this initiative is to offer students a sense of purpose by allowing them to give back to a cause close to their hearts.

Helpful related article: Early Childhood Development And The Magic of PlayAs a Family, Consider Doing Good Things TogetherYour Child’s Recovery From Trauma