There are certain basic facts concerning a teenager’s menstrual cycle that all parents, whether they are moms or fathers, should be aware of. Learn more about periods and their complications for teenagers and their phases.

There are several terms for menstruation, including “menses,” “your period,” “that time of the month,” and even “Aunt Flo.” That which has been built up during menstruation sheds during menstruation. Menstruation is the process through which the uterus sheds blood and tissue into the vagina.

*Image source: Pexels/Unsplash/Pixelbay

A woman’s menstrual cycle consists of more than just menstruation. Several physical and hormonal changes occur during a woman’s menstrual cycle as she prepares her body for pregnancy. Resetting the body to prepare for a new try at becoming pregnant occurs if pregnancy does not occur.

Too Soon Or Just Right?

*Image source: Unsplash/Pixelbay/Pexels

To parents, timing is important. What if her menstruation came early this month? That she hasn’t received, is it a problem?

Girls in the United States typically begin menstruating at the age of 12, but it can occur at any time between the ages of 8 and 15.

Periods and their Complications For Teenagers
*Image source: Pexels/Pixelbay/Unsplash

What Is a "Normal" Cycle, Anyway?

There are two menstrual cycles per year, each lasting around one month. When it comes to menstruation, the average is 28 days, but it can vary from 21 to 45 days. Typically, menstrual bleeding lasts from 2 to 7 days; however, this might vary from woman to woman.

Your teen’s periods may be irregular or unpredictable for the first few years following her first period. Often, these early cycles are anovulatory, which means that no ovulation occurs during the cycle.

*Image source: Pixelbay/Pexels/Unsplash

Following the first menstrual cycle (menarche), normal ovulation usually occurs within two years. However, some women may not ovulate for six years after their first menstrual cycle.

No one can say whether or not a given cycle will have ovulation; thus it’s safe to say that adolescent girls are still fertile.

Periods and their Complications For Teenagers
*Image source: Unsplash/Pixelbay/Pexels

There are four phases of the menstrual cycle.

In the course of the full monthly cycle, the uterine lining, the ovum (the egg), and the hormone levels all change and cycle. Menstruation, the follicular phase, ovulation, and the luteal phase are the four main phases of the menstrual cycle.

*Image source: Pixelbay/Pexels/Unsplash

1. Menstruation.

The uterine lining and bleeding mark the onset of the menstrual cycle. Women’s menstrual cycles range in length partly because of how long this phase lasts for each individual.

Periods and their Complications For Teenagers
*Image source: Pexels/Unsplash/Pixelbay

2. Follicle phase.

So, since the ovaries are being propelled toward producing an adult egg, they develop throughout this stage. In addition, the uterine lining is forming in anticipation of egg implantation, should pregnancy occur. Additionally, the duration of this phase varies.

*Image source: Pexels/Pixelbay/Unsplash

3. Ovulation.

In response to an increase in hormones, the ovaries secrete a mature egg through an ovarian follicle.

*Image source: Unsplash/Pixelbay/Pexels

4. The luteal phase of the moon's cycle.

This stage lasts for 14 days on average, with a few extra days here and there. Uterine lining continues to develop as preparation for embryo implantation occurs during this time. Pregnancy-promoting hormones are produced by an ovarian follicle, known as the “corpus luteum,” which is yellow. In the event of a miscarriage, the cycle repeats.

When to Be Concerned

In some instances, irregular menstrual cycles signify a medical problem. If your daughter has any doubts, it’s best to have her consult a medical professional. Any of the following signs in your daughter should be taken to a medical professional as soon as you see them:

Periods and their Complications For Teenagers
*Image source: Pixelbay/Pexels/Unsplash
  • By the time she turns 15, she still hasn’t had her period.
  • Her breasts haven’t matured by the time she’s 13, or within three years of that time, she hasn’t had her period.
  • Her menstruation hasn’t come for the first time in over three months.
  • The regularity and predictability of her menstrual cycle have been disrupted.
  • Her cycle lasts from 21 and 45 days, depending on how often she gets her period.
*Image source: Unsplash/Pixelbay/Pexels
  • Her cycle typically lasts a week and a half to a week.
  • She’s leaking more than normal, changing her pads or tampons more frequently every 1 or 2 hours.
  • In between her periods, she’s having a period.
  • She has excruciating cramps every month.
  • After wearing a tampon, she develops a fever or feels ill.

Concerns concerning periods and their complications for teenagers’ menstrual cycle should be discussed with a trustworthy healthcare provider. If there are underlying hormonal or other problems, your doctor may be able to assist you in some way.