Parents and tweens alike might find puberty a challenging time. Moods, bodies, hobbies, and even family relationships can shift as a child grows up. Even if you want your child to stay a child forever, the day will come when they enter puberty, and you will need to be ready. Before their child reaches puberty, here are some things parents should know. As long as you’re prepared, talking to your tween about puberty doesn’t have to be awkward.

The Basics of Puberty You Should Be Aware Of

Things can be awkward for you if you’re one of the few tweens who enter puberty before or after your peers. The effects of early puberty on your child can be considerable, and you should be aware of the difficulties your child can encounter if it occurs sooner rather than later.

Talking To Your Tween About Puberty
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Consult your child’s pediatrician about any issues you have so that you can assist your adolescent cope with bullying, improper behavior, and any other worries they may have.

Puberty typically begins in girls between the ages of 8 and 12. Boys often start later in life, between the ages of nine and fourteen.

Examining Those Shifts

Talking To Your Tween About Puberty
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A tween’s greatest fear during puberty is the unknown. Make sure you know what to expect so you can talk to your child about puberty and its joys and challenges. Tweens can adapt quickly to new situations, while others find it difficult and discouraging. Expect to have multiple short conversations rather than one big one as you go through puberty. It’s important to tell your tween you’re there for them whenever they need you.

Gender-Based Resources

Talking To Your Tween About Puberty
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Girls who are about to enter puberty have a slew of options. The depth of information provided by books and kits can range from the highly detailed to the bare essentials. After deciding which technique is ideal for her, shop around for a strategy that works for your tween.

For the benefit of boys

Talking To Your Tween About Puberty
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There aren’t as many resources for boys beginning puberty compared to girls. One reputable source can give your youngster the knowledge and confidence he needs.

Positivity in Action

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Tweens tend to focus on the negative aspects of aging and change. However, adolescence isn’t a bad thing in and of itself. Don’t forget to stress the positive parts of growing up and taking on greater responsibility.

Additional Factors to Consider

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When your tween shows an interest in the opposite sex, dating, and growing up, it may be both exhilarating and nerve-wracking. You never know what the future holds, so make sure you’re ready to discuss your family’s beliefs, expectations, and duties.

For Females Only

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Traveling away from home can cause a lot of anxiety for young women who fear getting their first period. Prepare your daughter ahead of time if you cannot be present when the experience occurs.