You’re bound to encounter political discussions in day-to-day life, and so does our kids. Here are the effects of political bullying on children. The politicians themselves have a lot to say about the people they’re running against, not to mention the public. And the majority of it is downright revolting in tone. The majority of stuff is downright nasty.

Is this speech negatively affecting our children? Listening to political speeches can profoundly affect children, especially when the speeches contain bullying or harsh language.

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Let that sink in for a while. It’s common for high school students to express a desire to one day serves as the country’s leader. Many children look up to the president, even if it isn’t something they aspire to be when they grow up. During an election, however, what lessons can be gleaned from the candidates for the highest position in the land?

Not only are kids watching the nation’s top political leaders attack one other, but they are also learning how to treat others with respect and dignity from their role models.

Isn't it reasonable to expect more from the leaders of our country?

The Effects Of Political Bullying On Children
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According to many polls, the vast majority of Americans agree. As a matter of fact, many individuals are concerned about a decline in civility. Schools, companies, and government all show a lack of respect in their eyes. An overwhelming majority of Americans — 65% — believe that civility is a major problem in the United States. About two-thirds of the population thinks it’s the least courteous place in the country.

Nearly half of those polled say they’ve lost interest in politics and government because of the level of rudeness and bullying they’ve witnessed. According to 83% of those surveyed in the study, those should not vote for uncivil people.

What Kids See in the Way of Political Bullying

The Effects Of Political Bullying On Children
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Politicians utilize many of the same bullying strategies as middle and high school kids, particularly when it comes to relational aggression. Verbal bullying, prejudiced bullying, and cyberbullying are all common forms of political bullying.

In addition, they employ a wide range of techniques that may be found in any American high school. Bullying doesn’t go away in high school, and it’s not just confined to the workplace; it also manifests itself in the political arena.

It’s not uncommon for children to be bullied during an election year.

Blame-Shifting

The Effects Of Political Bullying On Children
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Bullies resort to transferring responsibility when they attempt to divert attention away from themselves. In the same way, political candidates frequently transfer the blame. Typical examples include blaming anything from racism, immigration, gun control, and freedom of speech on the candidate they are running against.

Name-Calling

The Effects Of Political Bullying On Children
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Name-calling is one of the most popular types of bullying and has been around for a long time. The term “baby” or “loser” is frequently used by children on the playground. For some kids, this means calling other kids stupid and dummies.

Reputation-Bashing

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In order to undermine a political opponent’s credibility, one of the tried-and-true techniques is to ruin their reputation. No matter how they go about it, the end purpose is the same, whether they do it secretly or through an online smear campaign. The bully is trying to tarnish the reputation of their opponent. They may even resort to public shame as the last resort.

Spreading Rumors

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Spreading rumors or planting gossip against someone is a common tactic during election season. On the other hand, a political candidate’s campaign staff creates false tales to portray their rival in a negative light in the media and online.

Threatening in a Sly Way

It is well-documented that children and teenagers learn not only how to behave but also what is socially acceptable by watching television and other forms of media. Because of this, our nation’s leaders bullying others, whether on television or online, instills in children the idea that this is normal behavior, especially for those who aspire to reach the top someday.

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It is not uncommon for politicians to bully each other in a very overt and explicit manner, yet, some are more subtle. They can get their point across by using subliminal threats that, if questioned, can be rationalized away.

How Does It Affect Children?

It is well-documented that children and teenagers learn not only how to behave but also what is socially acceptable by watching television and other forms of media. Because of this, our nation’s leaders bullying others, whether on television or online, instills in children the idea that this is normal behavior, especially for those who aspire to reach the top someday.

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Election bullying has some unforeseen implications as well. Here are the three most common ways children are affected..

Political harassment instills anxiety and fear in victims.

Fear and worry among children were high throughout the 2016 election year, according to an informal survey done by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). According to instructors questioned, more than two-thirds of their kids are worried about what will happen to them following the 2016 election.

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Numerous studies have shown that youngsters frequently imitate what they watch on television, including political bullying. So, if bullying helps future leaders acquire votes or popularity, then some young people may naturally conclude that the same strategies may be used at school to gain popularity.

A study by SPLC shows that students are sometimes encouraged to use slurs, engage in name-calling, and make offensive statements when they see politicians in action. Meanwhile. Furthermore, when questioned about their behavior, they cite examples of politicians who have engaged in the same behavior.

School Bullying Is Linked to Political Bullying.

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There has been a rise in uncivil political discourse during the 2016 election season, according to the SPLC. Indeed, according to the SPLC study, bullying, harassment, and intimidation among instructors have risen.

It’s also common for kids to utilize political words or sentiments to harass and injure other children at school. This is just one of the effects of political bullying on our children.

How to Manage

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In order to lessen the negative effects of political bullying on children, it is essential to explain the motivations behind politicians’ acts. According to new research, children’s exposure to harmful content is lessened when their parents are active in their viewing habits.

Talk to your children about the political candidates’ bullying. Point out the flaws in their behavior and offer suggestions for how they might improve.

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When discussing politics at home or in the classroom, use election time as an opportunity to teach students about bullying. Also, keep an eye on what you say.

While it is perfectly acceptable to voice your own opinions on a specific election, do it respectfully. If you participate in online political debates, be careful not to bully those who don’t share your ideas. Keep in mind that your children are watching you for guidance on responding to and interpreting political bullying.