More and more kids are suffering from depression—especially girls. Many girls, though, aren’t receiving the care they need to recover. Here’s why discussing depression with your precious daughter is important!

Some parents avoid discussing their children’s mental health because of the stigma surrounding it. Depression is a topic that many parents are unfamiliar with or are unsure of how to raise their children.

Depression Among Teenagers is on the Rise.

Discussing Depression With Your Daughter Is Important
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Study results from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reveal a 37% rise in clinical depression among teenagers from 2004 to 2014. Some elder populations are experiencing a rise in depression rates, but it isn’t as dramatic as that among teens.

In any given year, almost 11% of teenagers suffer from depression. In girls, the percentage rises to 17.3%. Depression can be deadly if left untreated. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among those aged 10 to 24.

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Please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 if you are contemplating suicide or if you or a loved one is in danger. Anyone in immediate danger should dial 911 immediately.

Why Girls Are More prone to Depression than Boys

Depressed young girls are on the rise, but there is no clear reason. Depression risk factors may be to blame, according to John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers.

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Cyberbullying, for example, may be more prevalent among girls. According to research, teenage girls are more likely to use smartphones than their male peers. Depression has also been linked to excessive cell phone use.

Teenage girls are more likely to suffer from depression due to how they socialize. This was shown in a 2014 study published in Clinical Psychological Science.

Discussing Depression With Your Daughter Is Important
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Peers may be hostile toward them and encounter increased conflict with their buddies.

They may also be compelled to open up more to their peers about their concerns. However, instead of finding answers to their problems, their constant conversations about them may encourage them to dwell on the negative aspects of life.

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Teenage girls are known to exhibit signs of narcissism from time to time. That’s why adolescent females may take things personally or be particularly upset by the behavior of others.

Normal adolescent development should improve this. However, it can raise your daughter’s risk of depression in the interim.

How Do You Talk About Your Daughter's Mental Health As A Parent?

Discussing Depression With Your Daughter Is Important
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However, it’s crucial to watch for signs of sadness in your daughter, as they are more likely to occur. That’s why discussing depression with your daughter is important.

When a teen girl is depressed, she may not realize it. It’s not uncommon for people to suffer bodily symptoms like nausea and headaches. Or she may complain of being exhausted all the time, in which case her irritation may worsen.

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If this is the case, she may not be able to express her difficulties to you. However, if you begin by talking about depression, she may be more likely to open up. You can start a dialogue regarding your teen’s mental health in a few different ways:

  • Ask her how she’s feeling. Talk to your teen about their emotions from time to time. Remember to be gentle and loving when you say or do anything. If you’re feeling down, ask, “Are you alright?” Make it plain to her that she can come to you if she’s feeling down or angry or whatever else.
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  • Tell her you’d be happy to take her to a therapist if that’s what she needs. When it comes to seeking the help of a mental health expert, most teenagers aren’t sure they need it, let alone how to do so. Tell her you’re open to setting up a meeting if she thinks it’s a good idea.
  • You can help her by encouraging her to see her doctor. Make sure your teen has a private conversation with the doctor during regular checkups. Her physical and health concerns should be encouraged to be discussed.
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  • Make a list of times you’ve had difficulty. Be honest with your teen if you’ve ever been depressed or had other mental health concerns. Don’t create comparisons between your problems and those of your adolescent. Using a phrase like, “Oh, you think you’ve had it bad? By saying, “Hear what I went through,” you’re invalidating your teen’s difficulties.
  • Ask her if any of her friends are depressed. Ask your adolescent whether she knows of any other students at school or among her peers who are depressed. Talking about others rather than herself may encourage her to share more personal details about her life.
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  • Bring up stories regarding mental health in the media. ” Whether it’s about cyberbullying, sadness, or suicide, share stories you’ve seen in the news. Inquire about their thoughts on the stories and how they might be dealt with healthily.
  • Then, inquire about her plans for dealing with depression. Make certain your teen knows what to do if she becomes depressed. Discuss who she can speak to and where she can get assistance.

For The Benefit Of Your Teen, Get Help.

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Talk to your teen if you suspect she is depressed. If you have any additional concerns, make an appointment with her primary care physician. A mental health professional may be recommended by her doctor for further evaluation and treatment.

Teenagers can be treated for depression using a variety of medications. Your adolescent may benefit from medication, talk therapy, or a combination of the two.

Always remember that discussing depression with your daughter is important so that they will have a strong foundation to face life’s many problems in the future.