Bullied children often endure substantial personal issues, such as feelings of isolation and humiliation, as a result of their treatment by the bully. In addition, many people suffer from stress, worry, and low self-esteem. As a result, many people who have been bullied choose not to tell anybody about their experiences. Here are reasons why bullying victims suffer in silence.

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Bullying may be frightening and perplexing for many people, which is why many people choose to remain silent about it. Because of this, most children are unclear about what to do. Many bullying victims keep their experiences hidden while deciding what to do.

According to one study, 54% of kids who were bullied did not tell an adult at school about it. Children may be reluctant to admit they’re bullied for several reasons.

Embarrassment And Shame

Why Bullying Victims Suffer In Silence
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Bullying victims may feel powerless or weak and suffer in silence. A lot of kids feel shame and embarrassment because of this situation.

A physical characteristic, for example, can be a source of bullying for children who are already hyper-vigilant about it. Mistreatment can also take the form of being accused of anything. Either way, they’ll be embarrassed to bring it up in front of anyone.

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By bringing up the subject of the bullying, they would be exposing their “fault” to others. The mere prospect of confiding in an adult about being bullied might be more terrifying for some children than the bullying itself.

A survey indicated that 44 percent of kids reported being bullied because of their appearance, and 16 percent reported being targeted because of their race.. Students reported being bullied for their sexual orientation in 14 percent of cases.

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A total of 12 percent said they were singled out because they were impoverished. In comparison, 7 percent said they were bullied due to their disabilities. In all likelihood, none of these situations would be acceptable in the presence of children.

Retaliation Fear

Most children who are bullying victims assume that reporting a bully will have no effect and thereby suffer in silence. 5 In addition to feeling powerless, kids also worry that speaking up would simply make things worse for the bully.

Why Bullying Victims Suffer In Silence
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Forty percent of children who have been bullied say that their tormentors were larger and physically stronger, while 56 percent say that their tormentors had the power to influence other students’ opinions of them.

As a result, many children choose to deal with the situation independently rather than risk worsening it. They may even feel that the bullying would stop if they don’t say anything. Most of the time, they will only speak to an adult if the latter promised not to report the instances or take further measures.

The Anxiety Of Making Matters Worsen

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It’s only natural to take immediate action when you learn your child is a victim of bullying. However, your proclivity to step in and cure issues can be the same reason your child hesitates to approach you.

Many children worry that their parents will make a big deal out of their misbehavior. When contacting your child’s school or other parties involved, it’s crucial to keep your primary emotion in check and not rush to take action.

Anxiety over Being Accepted

Why Bullying Victims Suffer In Silence
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Kids often believe that to fit in, they must put up with bullying on occasion. To keep their social position, they’ll have little choice but to submit to bullying and peer pressure. Cliques are notorious for combining the adverse effects of both peer pressure and bullying.

Victimized children often need acceptance from the bullies themselves. Even if the person bullying them has a higher social status, they may endure fake friendships and nasty behavior to remain part of the group.

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Bullying victims between the ages of 12 and 18 say that the bully exerted a greater social influence on them than the victim’s peers. In addition, 31% of those surveyed said they had more money than they had before.

Fear of Being Accused of a Falsehood

Why Bullying Victims Suffer In Silence
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Teachers and parents often fail to recognize bullies as bullies themselves. They may be well-liked, excel academically, or enjoy a prestigious position in their community.

As a result, when the bullies pick on a particular victim who is prone to getting into problems, has a history of lying, or has other troubles with the school, the victim tends to assume that no one will believe what they say. They may be scared that others will think they’re lying or making it up when they tell their story.

Concerned with "Snitching."

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Most bullying instances occur when parents are either absent or are not close enough to see the actions of the children involved. When it comes to bullying, there’s often an unwritten rule of silence among friends. Because of the code in existence, bullying will continue to take place. As a result of bullying, many victims avoid speaking up because they are terrified of being labeled a “snitch,” “baby,” or “tattletale.”

Educators must ensure that they create an environment where reporting bullying is not only acceptable but expected if they want to break the culture of secrecy surrounding bullying. As a result, they must exercise caution when responding to allegations of bullying.

Lack of Self-Esteem

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Many children are aware of their flaws at a young age. A lot of adolescents feel that if someone focuses on one of their faults and uses it to mock or humiliate them, they deserve the treatment.

Having low self-esteem or being overly critical of oneself can lead a child to tolerate harsh treatment from a bully because they believe the bully’s comments. Their self-esteem may be permanently damaged as a result.

Ignorance of Bullying

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Purely physical bullying is more likely to be reported because it is so apparent. Relational aggression, on the other hand, is more likely to go undetected and labeled as bullying.

Sometimes, children don’t comprehend that bullying also includes spreading stories about others, isolating them, and destroying their relationships with them. Bullying can take the form of even the most innocuous actions, such as taunting.

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Parents and educators should discuss with children what constitutes bullying to be aware of the consequences of their actions. Help your children recognize the value of mutual respect and support in developing strong bonds of friendship and other social connections.

Doubting Its Efficacy

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But the underlying message that kids must be tough in adverse situations still remains, despite recent success with bullying prevention. Because of their own abuse, many people believe that adults won’t help them, or that the adults in their lives will view them as untrustworthy because of their situation.

If bullying victims think adults expect them to manage the matter on their own, they may be right and just suffer in silence. As a result, just 39 percent of bullied high school students report harassment and bullying they have been subjected to.

Inability to Make a Report

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There is no way for kids to know if reporting bullying would have any effect when the perpetrator is anonymous or unidentified. Aside from that, they have no idea how to report the bullying to social media platforms or ISPs.

Over a quarter of cyberbullied kids don’t report it or think they can’t do anything.

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Educators and parents alike must show children how to deal with cyberbullying. People who cyberbully or troll others can be taught how to file complaints.

It’s important for parents and teachers to talk to their children about how to block internet bullying. It’s also critical to show them how to use the privacy and security settings on various internet services, such as social networking apps and games.

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Parents, teachers, and other caregivers should be aware of the warning signs of bullying because children rarely tell an adult about it. Kids who complain about school drama, other students messing with them, or their lack of peers may be implying that they are being bullied.

These are all indications that kids are being bullied in some way. Compliment them on their bravery in coming forward. This demonstrates your desire for an open exchange of ideas about the problems they face. In addition, it’s critical that you trust your children and commit to working with them to come up with creative solutions.

Keep your emotions under check, even if it’s challenging. The best thing to do is to remain cool and work with your child to devise a course of action. Children are less prone to become depressed if they believe they have options.